Snowdon: A Life in View

I’m delighted to now be able to share news of a major display on the life and work of Lord Snowdon which I am curating for this autumn. Snowdon: A Life in View at the National Portrait Gallery from 26 September,  is selected from a very generous gift of photographs from Lord Snowdon to the Gallery in 2013, and will coincide with a new monograph published by Rizzoli.

Snowdon: A Life in View – Written by Antony Armstrong Jones, Foreword by Graydon Carter, Contributions by Frances von Hofmannsthal and Tom Ford, Introduction by Patrick Kinmonth. Publication date: 23 September 2014

Snowdon’s extensive career in portraiture and fashion photography has included a six-decade working relationship with Vogue magazine (from 1951). He also produced pioneering photo essays on social issues for The Sunday Times (1962–90). Highlight portraits in this display will include studies of writers such as Nell Dunn and Graham Greene, actors such as Julie Christie and Terence Stamp, and cultural figures such as newspaper editor Harold Evans. The display will also offer the opportunity to enjoy new selections from book Private View (1965), Snowdon’s important examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery. You can find out more about Snowdon: A Life in View via the National Portrait Gallery’s recent press release.

I also recommend exploring Snowdon Review, an online collection of stories from the photographer’s vast archive, beautifully curated by the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal.

Coinciding with a new monograph published by Rizzoli, Snowdon: A Life in View (26 Sep 2014-21 Jun 2015), will highlight studio portraits from the 1950s to the 1990s, alongside selections from Private View Snowdon’s important 1965 examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery.

Curated from a major gift to the Gallery in 2013, in close consultation with the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal, the display includes over 40 black-and-white portraits taken throughout his expansive and influential career.

– See more at: http://www.rps.org/news/2014/july/snowdon-npg-donation#sthash.J6l2eiOZ.dpuf

Coinciding with a new monograph published by Rizzoli, Snowdon: A Life in View (26 Sep 2014-21 Jun 2015), will highlight studio portraits from the 1950s to the 1990s, alongside selections from Private View Snowdon’s important 1965 examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery.

Curated from a major gift to the Gallery in 2013, in close consultation with the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal, the display includes over 40 black-and-white portraits taken throughout his expansive and influential career.

– See more at: http://www.rps.org/news/2014/july/snowdon-npg-donation#sthash.J6l2eiOZ.dpuf

Coinciding with a new monograph published by Rizzoli, Snowdon: A Life in View (26 Sep 2014-21 Jun 2015), will highlight studio portraits from the 1950s to the 1990s, alongside selections from Private View Snowdon’s important 1965 examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery.

Curated from a major gift to the Gallery in 2013, in close consultation with the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal, the display includes over 40 black-and-white portraits taken throughout his expansive and influential career.

– See more at: http://www.rps.org/news/2014/july/snowdon-npg-donation#sthash.J6l2eiOZ.dpuf

Miniclick Response Exhibition

Earlier this month I joined Miniclick for their first Response Exhibition, an event devised with Hastings based Lucy Bell Gallery. Almost 100 photographers submitted a total of more than 700 images, in advance and in person. The images were projected during a two-day event at the Phoenix Brighton, and discussed by photographers, the public, Lucy Bell, Jim Stephenson from Miniclick, Brighton Photo Fringe emerging curators Lulu Evans and Kayung Lai, and guests including myself, Eleanor MacNair, Rachel Segal Hamilton and Laura Pannack.

As images from each submitted portfolio were discussed, chosen images were printed, and added to an every changing wall, in which pairings and themes were found and continuously developed. At the end of the event ten photographers work was chosen for an exhibition at Lucy Bell Gallery which is now on show and continues until 23rd November.

Read more about the Response Exhibition on the Miniclick blog, where you can also view a slide show of work by the selected photographers Jocelyn Allen, Christopher Bethell, Richard Cutler, Peter Gates, Sam Laughlin, Margaret Mitchell, Nikosono, Kajal Nisha Patel, Kristina Salgvik and Amelia Shepherd. It was wonderful to be involved with this exciting and highly collaborative event; an experiment in mass curating which I hope Miniclick repeats in the future.

Brighton, November 2013, Photo: author’s own.

Autumn news

Returning to London this week after a happy holiday in Burgundy, thoughts return to plans and hopes for the months ahead. First however, a quick note on recent photography projects.

I’ve greatly enjoyed spending the last few months focusing on the work of 19th century photographer Herbert Watkins. Display Herbert Watkins: Characters and Caricatures which continues at the National Portrait Gallery until 17 November, showcases my new research on albumen prints from the important Watkins album; considers Watkins’s early experiments using caricature and photo-collage; and examines the photographer’s famous portraits of Charles Dickens within a wider context. Discover more on Watkins in my new blog post for the National Portrait Gallery here.

This year, Source Photographic Review kindly invited me to be a selector for the MA/MFA section of their annual online showcase for emerging photographic talent from photography courses across the UK and Ireland. Reviewing the diverse and impressive range of MA/MFA portfolios submitted was a wonderful and rewarding opportunity to discover and consider the work and concerns of this year’s postgraduates. My thoughts on selected photographers Ochi Reyes, Lewis Bush, Adriana Monsalve, Nathalie Joffre, and Sharon O’Neill are now online.

Last month after several online judging rounds, I spent a very enjoyable day debating and discussing entries submitted to this year’s Association of Photographers Open Awards. Out of nearly 1500 images, my fellow judges and I selected 61 images that make up the final 2013 AOP Open exhibition which will be shown at B3, The Old Truman Brewery, this Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th October. You can now view the entire show online and choose the image you think is worthy of the Public Choice Award via the AOP Awards website. I hope you enjoy the exhibition!