Snowdon: A Life in View

I’m delighted to now be able to share news of a major display on the life and work of Lord Snowdon which I am curating for this autumn. Snowdon: A Life in View at the National Portrait Gallery from 26 September,  is selected from a very generous gift of photographs from Lord Snowdon to the Gallery in 2013, and will coincide with a new monograph published by Rizzoli.

Snowdon: A Life in View – Written by Antony Armstrong Jones, Foreword by Graydon Carter, Contributions by Frances von Hofmannsthal and Tom Ford, Introduction by Patrick Kinmonth. Publication date: 23 September 2014

Snowdon’s extensive career in portraiture and fashion photography has included a six-decade working relationship with Vogue magazine (from 1951). He also produced pioneering photo essays on social issues for The Sunday Times (1962–90). Highlight portraits in this display will include studies of writers such as Nell Dunn and Graham Greene, actors such as Julie Christie and Terence Stamp, and cultural figures such as newspaper editor Harold Evans. The display will also offer the opportunity to enjoy new selections from book Private View (1965), Snowdon’s important examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery. You can find out more about Snowdon: A Life in View via the National Portrait Gallery’s recent press release.

I also recommend exploring Snowdon Review, an online collection of stories from the photographer’s vast archive, beautifully curated by the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal.

Coinciding with a new monograph published by Rizzoli, Snowdon: A Life in View (26 Sep 2014-21 Jun 2015), will highlight studio portraits from the 1950s to the 1990s, alongside selections from Private View Snowdon’s important 1965 examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery.

Curated from a major gift to the Gallery in 2013, in close consultation with the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal, the display includes over 40 black-and-white portraits taken throughout his expansive and influential career.

– See more at: http://www.rps.org/news/2014/july/snowdon-npg-donation#sthash.J6l2eiOZ.dpuf

Coinciding with a new monograph published by Rizzoli, Snowdon: A Life in View (26 Sep 2014-21 Jun 2015), will highlight studio portraits from the 1950s to the 1990s, alongside selections from Private View Snowdon’s important 1965 examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery.

Curated from a major gift to the Gallery in 2013, in close consultation with the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal, the display includes over 40 black-and-white portraits taken throughout his expansive and influential career.

– See more at: http://www.rps.org/news/2014/july/snowdon-npg-donation#sthash.J6l2eiOZ.dpuf

Coinciding with a new monograph published by Rizzoli, Snowdon: A Life in View (26 Sep 2014-21 Jun 2015), will highlight studio portraits from the 1950s to the 1990s, alongside selections from Private View Snowdon’s important 1965 examination of the British art world created in collaboration with art critic John Russell and Bryan Robertson, then director of the Whitechapel Art Gallery.

Curated from a major gift to the Gallery in 2013, in close consultation with the photographer’s daughter Frances von Hofmannsthal, the display includes over 40 black-and-white portraits taken throughout his expansive and influential career.

– See more at: http://www.rps.org/news/2014/july/snowdon-npg-donation#sthash.J6l2eiOZ.dpuf

Blumenfeld Studio: New York, 1941–1960

A new exhibition opened today at Somerset House, Blumenfeld Studio: New York, 1941–1960, celebrating the career of portrait and fashion photographer Erwin Blumenfeld (1897–1969) most known for his work for the leading fashion magazines of the 1940s and 1950s including Vogue and Harpers Bazaar. The show focuses on the little-known history of his photography studio at 222 Central Park South in New York and showcases around 100 colour photographs from his archive. I can’t wait to visit soon. An in-depth feature was recently published in The Telegraph, and if you missed the screening of the first documentary on his life and work, The Man Who Shot Beautiful Women, I highly recommend catching it while you still can on BBC iPlayer (available until May 29th).

One of Blumenfeld’s most dramatic and frequently imitated images is his ‘doe eye’ cover shot for Vogue in 1950, which has become one of the most iconic covers in Vogue‘s history. The model, Jean Patchett, is shown reduced to a flat white background with a pair of lips, a beauty spot and one eye highlighted by a flick of eyeliner. Here’s a brief TV interview with Patchett and presenter Edward R. Murron from January 1955. (The excerpt below also shows Blumenfeld’s original photograph before it’s adaptation into the final cover):

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E48wOMwJI4&w=560&h=315]